Rocks from the Sky

 

How much do you know about astronomy?

 

Today we have challenging questions about meteorites based on the article “Meteorite Identification” by Richard K. Herd and Christopher D.K. Herd in the Observer’s Handbook 2019.

I created seven questions that could be answered without reading this chapter.

You have up to ten minutes to complete the challenge today.

 

Begin now. Do your best.

  1. Meteorites witnessed in our atmosphere and recovered based on that observation are called meteorite ______________.

 

  1. Over 67,5000 meteorites are known. From which continent do most of these come?

 

  1. Of those 67,000 known meteorites, how many are so similar to the Apollo mission return samples that the are called “Lunar”?

NWA 6950 Lunar

  1. Most objects that hit the surface of the Earth hit water or land in forests, jungles, or mountains. Few are witnessed. What city witnessed an event on February 15, 2013?

 

  1. Impact craters on Earth are typically how much larger than the impacting object?

 

  1. What do we call small glassy objects formed from molten material splashed into space by meteor impacts on Earth?

 

  1. There are basically three types of meteorites. Which type is most common?

 

OK, pencils down. Scroll down for directions for checking your answers.

 

Please read directions below:

Step 1: Please contribute to one of these charities linked below. If you are a winner and contribute, please ask recipient to notify me of the amount so I might match the first $100.

  1. Michael J. fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research

https://www.michaeljfox.org/

Click on “Get Involved”

  1. Guilford County Animal Shelter

       http://www.myguilford.com/animal-services/animal-shelter/

Look under “Donate to the Animal Shelter.”

  1. Guilford Senior Resources

http://senior-resources-guilford.org/

Look under “You Can Help”

  1. Jo Cline Memorial Endowment

    Screen shot 2015-08-01 at 6.58.52 AM
    Jo Cline

https://www.gtcc.edu/community-engagement/cline-observatory/support-the-observatory-jo-cline.php

 

Step 2: Check your written answers to the answers below. If your answer is correct, give it a check mark.

Step 3: If your answer is wrong, put a small X.

Step 4: If you think my answer is questionable, write yourself a note, do the research and let me know if I’ve erred. Thanks in advance,

 

You are welcome to play with us during the next live broadcast of

“Let’s talk astronomy” this coming Monday beginning at 8 am eastern US time on Periscope.

Periscope is a live video streaming app for Android and iOS available in the App

Screen shot 2015-12-28 at 8.16.26 PM
Periscope

Store.

On Monday, February 25, 2019, our Astronomy Challenge was about meteorites.

The questions are given above, the correct answers and the winners are given below.

Congratulations to all winners and thank-you to all participants.

Play the Astronomy Challenge live on Periscope’s “ Let’s talk astronomy” 8 am (Eastern US time) on Mondays.

 

Correct Answers……..Periscope Winners:

 

  1. Meteorite falls…………………No one on the live Periscope broadcast got this correct answer.  Fewer than 1,40  meteorite falls are known.    With no record of arrival, we call it a “meteorite faind.”

 

  1. Antarctica…………@Pircano:  more than 43,000 are from Antarctica.

 

  1. 140……………….@Suyog_40:  An object hits the Moon and some ejeca escapees lunar gravity.  At least 114 meteorites are considered Martian in origin.

 

  1. Chelyabinsk………………..@Livecast247

 

  1. 10 times……………….@Suyog_92

 

  1. Tektites………@speear40:

 

  1. Stones………..@Suyog_92

 

If you find a mistake, please let me know.

 

Thanks goes out to all participants,

and

Congratulations to everyone who got one right.

 


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