“Science lies not in the facts themselves but in their arrangement.”

Miss Leavitt’s Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who discovered How to Measure the Universe   By George Johnson Atlas Books, 2005   One night at the observatory a voice in the dark asked “How do I reconcile the information that the Andromeda Galaxy is 2 million light years away with the growing number … More “Science lies not in the facts themselves but in their arrangement.”

Humanity’s Cradle

A short review of Aurora, a science-fiction novel by Kim Stanley Robinson, Orbit Books, New York, 2015. This is the story of humans and their attempt to spread to planets that orbit other stars. Aurora is the name of the multi-generation starship heading to Tau Ceti. Specifically, the humans’ goal is a moon of a giant … More Humanity’s Cradle

Let’s Talk Astronomy

One of the really great benefits of teaching astronomy is having a group of people who are somewhat interested in the subject, to talk with about current events and astronomy in general.  I’ve enjoyed the opportunities to speak before community groups, and, again, the conversations with members of the audiences are the best part. And … More Let’s Talk Astronomy

History of Astronomy: Then Something Else Happened

Well-positioned conjunctions of bright planets are fairly rare.  The recent meeting of Jupiter and Saturn in the evening sky provided a wonderous sight that we won’t see again for many years.  Even though these two planets technically have a conjunction once a year, according to Dr. Patrick Hartigan of Rice University the next Jupiter-Venus conjunction that … More History of Astronomy: Then Something Else Happened

The Asteroid Threat

I began reading this book by William E. Burrows a couple weeks ago.  The subject, the title, and the cover art, are all very appealing, but I just could not connect with this book, and my reading slowed to a crawl.  Then I began skipping paragraphs, soon whole sections, and finally I was skipping whole … More The Asteroid Threat